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Difficulties of Learning Koine Greek,
Although the following might sound sort of wild, just think about it and see what you think.  I believe one very big reason Koine Greek is so difficult to learn is because there is no solid and good pronunciation for it.  I am even afraid some markings about the Greek text, and some rules of Greek pronunciation are not appropriate, and actually distort and destroy the real pronunciation.   
I believe today's pronunciation of Greek is very improper, since accent marks are not consistent on the different forms of the same word.  Rather when a particular Greek word has a different form or ending, the accent often is moved to a different syllable of the word making the word largely sound like a totally different word.    
I believe today's pronunciation of Greek is also very improper, because compound words are not sufficiently pronounced as the individual words in the compond word, but rather the words are blended together in a way that makes a totally new and very rare Greek word, while one cannot even hear the actual small words within the compound word as it is spoken!  
I have also noticed some places where the ruff breathing marks quite obviously are not consistent and correct, and which also messes up the pronunciation.  
Another difficult issue about Greek is that some words seem to be spelled differently at different places, making one wonder whether in old times the word was pronounced the same, even when spelled differently, or if it was also pronounced in different ways.  
I believe another reason learning Koine Greek is so difficult is because much of the Koine Greek education system focuses on very technical and complicated grammar, rather than a hands on and real life experience with the words and language.  I believe more emphasis needs to be placed on learning Greek root words and the many related forms of the word.  More emphasis also needs to be placed in showing the relation between the Greek words and the English.  In learning a language one obviously must get very familiar with the words and the various ways they are used.  Language largely must become subconscious.  Too much technical grammar can distract one from really learning the language.  The following was written by someone struggling with very technical grammar;  
Hi guys
"I started on verbs, Mounce holds off verbs until  you get the noun system down, 15 chapters in he starts the Verbs. I am at  chapter 21 and I'm getting punch drunk, excuse the pun
It's like I never heard of these words before this and I'm getting blasted with words like mood voice, aspect, person, middle. Then on to Present active, present passive, present middle, future active, future middle, deponents, Verbal  roots, future middle, liquid future active, liquid future middle, imperfect active, imperfect middle passive.
Next week Aorist active and aorist middle. Wow that was a mouth full.     Please tell me it will sink in! Or some pointers wouldn't be too bad at this point."  End of quote.
I believe two of the most powerful and useful tools to learn Greek would be, having a recording where a person reads a short phrase of the Bible in English and then in Greek (while also at the same time having the Greek text appearing on a screen).  This would be sort of like listening to a Greek speaker, with an interpreter.  The second useful tool would be to take well known songs and insert appropriate Greek words in them instead of the English, so one could largely know what the Greek words mean because of the melody of the song.  Yet neither of these two tools have really been developed as yet (although the one tool is being worked on).  Yet both of these tools will need a good pronunciation.   
Yet even with all the difficulties about Koine Greek, I day by day am learning to read and understand it.  I can read many Scriptures in the Septuagint quite easily, as well as in the New Testament.  Yet there are still verses that are very difficult for me.  

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