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More photos from Chinese Heart of Texas.
















More Hard Work
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"Pershing Chinese" at Fort Sam Houston

Having been rescued from Mexico by Gen. John Pershing, the 427 Chinese arrived just in time to assist in the monumental task of helping to build Camp Travis. This was a new training site for the National Army which "Black Jack" Pershing would lead to victory in France during WW I. Here they unload one of the 1,600 flatcars of lumber needed to complete the barracks and other structures ordered for the camp at Fort Sam Houston, near San Antonio, Tx. (Author)



















!917 Flu Victim
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Only one "Pershing Chinese" succumbed to the deadly virus epidemic.

Chung Kee Wong died of influenza and was the first of ten "Pershing Chinese" who would be interred in the original San Antonio National Cemetery between 1917 and 1922. Those ten men died while they were in Army custody from various causes including a suicide. (Author)


Suey Sang Market, 1927
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An early Chinese family owned grocery store in San Antonio

Mr. Ng gave nearly a third of his floor space in SUEY SANG Market to a fully equipped meat counter including a cold storage locker. Fresh meats and capable meat cutters were necessary to the success of any market in the growing city. This 1929 photo shows a typical, well managed neighborhood grocery store of the day. (Virginia Wong)


School Girls
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San Antonio Chinese School was started in 1927 on San Saba Street.

Seen here in the Chinese School's backyard is Tuck Lee, Gim Wong, Betty Eng, Mary Wong, May Lee and Dora Wong about 1936. Behind them on the left is the outhouse which served the kids and teachers for many years. Legend held that the old Catholic girls school building was haunted by a ghost of one of the nuns who originally taught there many years before it was reopened by the San Antonio Chinese community. (Sam K. Eng)